Hizbullah: On Lebanese sheep- and a “rebuffed” United States

Flag of Hizbullah


 

Nabil Haitham of the Lebanese pro-Hizbullah Lebanese newspaper Assafir wrote a short article that has valuable insights on Hizbullah.

In the article he attributes some comments to “Hizbullah members.”

The other comments he attributed to the # 2 public face of Hizbullah, Shaykh Naim Qassim.

Shaykh Naim Qassim is known in the West as the author of Hizbullah: the Story from Within. He is Sayed Hassan Nasrallah’s deputy and is known as one of the more hawkish leaders of the group.

The comment attributed by Haitham to Hizbullah members is that some in the group see the group confronting internal and external challenges. The external enemies are referred to as “wolves”, and the internal enemies, that is Lebanese who oppose the group, are described as “sheep who have grown claws.” This is a very interesting use of language. Thinking of the group’s internal adversaries as “sheep” is interesting characterization of fellow Lebanese, individuals or groups.

Are they “lambs” because the group is preparing them for slaughter? Or because they are not armed while the group is armed?  Whatever the intent is or the meaning of this usage of the word lambs- on the face of it- it reveals an arrogant and condescending attitude to fellow Lebanese.

Haitham also attributes certain comments to Shaykh Qassim.  Qassim claims that “Americans” tried to open channels of communication with Hizbullah and the Hizbullah rebuffed the U.S. “We wanted a change in mentality and they wanted a photo- op.”

Who were these Americans? From which branch of government?

Most likely Qassim was referring to former President Jimmy Carter who asked to meet with the group- a meeting it declined.

Below is link to the interview.


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